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Stack of books with money

In Part 1 of this two-part series, we looked at the fundraising efforts of some specific libraries.

In Part 2, we’ll review some resources to help you get started with your own fundraising initiative.

Libraries have figured out some great ways to close the gap between shrinking budgets and increasing usage. There are lots of resources available to help you generate some fundraising ideas of your own.

The ALA’s Frontline Fundraising Toolkit is a free resource that can be viewed as a flipbook or PDF. It discusses how libraries of all sizes can get started with fundraising, using these eight steps:

  1. Recruit help.
  2. Examine your library’s community.
  3. Tie your library to community issues.
  4. Develop your case.
  5. Identify potential donors.
  6. Make your fundraising visible.
  7. Be realistic about the kinds of fundraising your library can succeed at.
  8. Have fun with fundraising!

The guide also covers annual funds, memorials and tributes, online giving, and planned giving, as well as how to deepen relationships and transform donors from one-time givers to long-term library supporters.

 

Additionally, the ALA hosts a site specifically aimed at school libraries, with links to grants programs, news, and resources.

Librarians who want to stay connected to the latest programming initiatives and resources for public, academic, special, or school libraries will want to check out the Programming Librarian, an ALA-sponsored online resource “for all things related to presenting cultural and community programs for all types and sizes of libraries.”

Diana Silveira, president of Novare Library Resources, provides some free advice about tools such as KickStarter and Google Wallet in her SlideShare presentation, “Online Fundraising for Libraries.”

You can also find more in-depth, paid sources devoted to library fundraising, like the forthcoming Beyond Book Sales: The Complete Guide to Raising Real Money for Your LibraryThis book focuses on private fundraising activities with the highest return for both small and large libraries.

Some companies, such as Entertainment Funding, offer fundraisers such as coupon books that are specifically tailored to libraries.

For many useful links to FAQs about fundraising in general—including topics such as internet fundraising, tax deductions for special event tickets, and evaluating fundraising costs—browse the Resource Center of the Association for Fundraising Professionals (AFP).

04 Dec 2013

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