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Dewey rules tattoo

Librarians blog about things you’d expect—like useful library resources, keeping kids safe online, and improving your technology skills. But they also have other stuff on their minds. And that makes for some fascinating reading.

Several librarian bloggers have built impressive followings, including Bobbi Newman (“Librarian by Day”), “The Annoyed Librarian,” and Gwyneth Jones (“The Daring Librarian”).

Scouring the internet, you can come across “10 Best” lists and “Top 25” awards for librarian bloggers, including annual winners of the Fascination Awards for the most inspirational and thought-provoking blogs (there’s a special category for librarians). Some of the blogs honored on last year’s list are:

• Karen Yingling’s “Ms. Yingling Reads” is a blog that reviews books for middle school students, especially boys.• “Watch. Connect. Read.” is a blog that explores children’s literature through book trailers, and is maintained by John Schumacher, a K-5 teacher-librarian.• “Digibooklibrarian” is a blog written by Kymberly Keeton, a graduate student in Library Science and Information Technology who describes herself as “a writer, entrepreneur, artistic socialite, and future librarian.”• Julie Greller’s “A Media Specialist’s Guide to the Internet” carries the tagline “…because you never know when you’ll need a cybrarian.”• “The Phantom Paragrapher” is written by New Zealand librarian Paula Phillips, who calls herself “librarian by day, book reviewer by night.”

But you can also find some pretty unusual posts on topics seemingly far afield from the normal librarian concerns.

For example, Sarah Houghton, director of the San Rafael (CA) Public Library, writes a blog called “Librarian in Black,” which recently featured a post entitled “The Bartending Librarian: How Past Odd Jobs Help You Now.”

Ivan Chew, the “Rambling Librarian” from Singapore, weaves his library-themed posts around others that reflect his interest in music and in Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use one’s creative work on conditions of the artist’s choosing.

“Adventures of a Misfit Librarian,” billed as “a blog about the life of a snarky 20-something librarian,” includes a post called “Forgotten Photos from My iPhone: Food Porn Edition.”

The “Morbid Anatomy” blog is affiliated with a research library and private museum of the same name in Brooklyn, New York. Its tagline is “Surveying the interstices of art and medicine, death and culture.”

And “The Obnoxious Librarian from Hades” would be on this list no matter what he wrote about, simply due to his intriguing blog name. The blog’s tagline is “a satirical look at life in a large bureaucracy,” and the author-librarian’s profile photo features an impressive back tattoo with the words “Dewey Rules.” 

Sometimes, librarians do stick with their normal topics but find ways to make them more entertaining. In “Laika’s MedLibLog,” described as “a medical librarian’s exploration of the web 2.0 world and beyond,” one post is titled “Of Mice and Men Again: New Genomic Study Helps Explain why Mouse Models of Acute Inflammation do not Work in Men.”

Let us know if you’ve read these blogs, or if there are other librarian blogs you enjoy.

26 Sep 2013 | Posted by Shannon Janeczek

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