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On February 13, 2013, a memo issued by the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) directed most federal research funding agencies to develop plans for expanding public access to the research they fund.

The first drafts of those plans will be shared sometime this year and are expected to support the growth of Open Access publishing and author self-archiving, as well as increased access to the scientific data associated with research funded by the U.S. federal government.

To read a discussion about open access and how ProQuest is working with these changes in policy, take a look at today’s Scholarly Kitchen blog, where they interviewed Richard Huffine, ProQuest’s Senior Director for the U.S. Federal Government market.

Richard joined ProQuest in 2013 after a 15-year career in the U.S. federal government, managing both libraries and information services for scientific agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Geological Survey.  In his role with ProQuest, Richard is looking at these changes in policy as opportunities for ProQuest to strengthen and develop new business relationships with research funding agencies. He also works on efforts to leverage the expansion of public access to support the government market that uses ProQuest information solutions.

Richard’s next presentation on this topic will be on January 24, 2014 at the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS) Midwinter Symposium, “Here There Be Dragons: Public Access to Federally Funded Research.”

You can also view the slides from Richard’s November 22, 2013, presentation on the same topic for the National Federation of Advanced Information Services (NFAIS).

15 Jan 2014 | Posted by Shannon Janeczek

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