Skip to main content
Journal of Cave and Karst Studies
Audience:
Academic, Special adult
ISSN:
2331-3714
Publisher:
The National Speleological Society
Website:
http://caves.org/pub/journal/
Peer reviewed
Open access

Reviewed by: Cheryl LaGuardia, Research Librarian, Widener Library, Harvard University

The Journal of Cave & Karst Studies is a scholarly journal about cave science, “dedicated to the advancement of science, education, and exploration.” It is published three times a year by the 10,000 member-strong National Speleological Society, whose website motto notes: We explore. We study. We protect.” The journal is a multidisciplinary publication, offering material of interest to speleologists, anthropologists, biologists, earth scientists, ecologists, hydrologists, paleologists, and other researchers across the social sciences and the sciences. The editors seek “original, unpublished manuscripts concerning the scientific study of caves or other karst features….” Although the instructions to authors state that “preference  is  given  to manuscripts of importance to North American speleology,” areas of study here include regions worldwide, as an examination of the articles in the latest issue, 2016, reveals: “Vertebrate fauna in caves of eastern Tennessee within the Appalachians karst region, USA,” “Surface and subsurface karstification of aquifers in arid regions: the case study of Cheshme-Ali Spring, NE Iran,” “Harpactea karaschkhan sp. n., a new cave-dwelling blind spider species from the Mediterranean Region of Turkey,” and “Fungi isolated and quantified from bat guano and air in Harmanecká and Driny Caves (Slovakia).” Subjects addressed here range from bats to stone tools, carbon transfer, frog hatching, trechines, karst aquifers, subterranean habitats, and much, much more, based on what can be found in and about caves and karsts.

The research articles are multi-authored, extensively referenced, and accompanied by excellent images, tables, graphs, and other data formats. Some issues of the journal also offer scholarly book reviews which are heavily-referenced, as well. Text and graphics are in high resolution, and pdfs can be downloaded or printed easily.  

If your library serves serious cave scholars and others engaged in deep research involving karst regions, this title is a must-know-about/must have (cataloged in your collection for ready discovery).

30 May 2016
Interested in contributing to an upcoming Magazines for Libraries™ Update? Contact Cheryl LaGuardia.

Search the Blog

Archive

Follow