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Studi Irlandesi
Audience:
Academic
ISSN:
2239-3978
Publisher:
Firenze University Press
Website:
http://www.fupress.net/index.php/bsfm-sijis
Peer reviewed
Open access

Reviewed by: Cheryl LaGuardia, Research Librarian, Widener Library, Harvard University

Begun in 2009, one of the aims of Studi irlandesi: A Journal of Irish Studies, is “to promote and contribute to the interdisciplinary debate on themes and research issues pertaining to every aspect of Irish culture, in order to create a place for an international debate and high quality research on Irish literary studies, history, cultural perspectives and linguistic inquiry, from the Romantic Era to the present age.” Another aim is “to stimulate discussion on problematic aspects of Irish culture: history, politics, social environment, as well as literature and art.” The editors are especially welcoming of new scholars, “encourag[ing] young scholars to publish the results of their - completed or partial - research, and [to] take part in the international debate, both in traditional formats and digital media.” Published, interestingly enough, by Firenze University Press, articles are available in both English and Italian. Yet another goal of the editors is “to set up a network linking together European “sister” periodicals, such as Études Irlandaises and Estudios Irlandeses. Studi irlandesi is published once each year.

Number 6 for 2016, the latest available issue, is a thematic volume entitled, Italia Mia: Transnational Ireland in the Nineteenth Century. It offers the articles, “Irish-European Entanglements in the Nineteenth Century,” “’An Italian of the Vatican type’: The Roman Formation of Cardinal Paul Cullen, Archbishop of Dublin,” “Confounding the Garibaldian Liars: The Letters of Albert Delahoyde,” “Irish Soldier of the Papal Battalion of St Patrick and Papal Zouave in Italy, 1860-1870,” “John Hogan in Rome, 1824-1849,” “Portraits and the Artist: Richard Rothwell’s Roman Adventures,” “A Musical Italy: Michael W. Balfe’s Italian Experiences,” “Lady Morgan in Italy: A Traveller with an Agenda,” “Charles Lever: An Irish Writer in Italy,” “’ From Cork [...] to St. Peter’s Cupola’: The Idea of Italy in the Writings of Francis Sylvester Mahony.” There is a Miscellanea section with the pieces, “Luke Wadding and Irish Diplomatic Activity in Seventeenth-Century Rome,” “Un interesse reciproco: lo scambio di rappresentanze diplomatiche tra Santa Sede e Irish Free State,” “Political Prisoners and the Irish Language: A North-South Comparison,” “’Who am I? Well, I’m Irish anyway, that’s something,’ Iris Murdoch and Ireland,” and “Resisting Motherhood in Thomas Kilroy’s Talbot’s Box,” along with four poems, two Voices pieces (“A Poet and a President. A Conversation with Michael D. Higgins, President of Ireland” and “’On the brink of the absolutely forbidden’: In Conversation with Mary Morrissy”), and several scholarly book reviews, some in English and some in Italian.

As can be seen from this content, this is a highly specialized title that will be most useful to scholars studying Irish culture and authors in an Italian context or connection.

16 Oct 2016
Interested in contributing to an upcoming Magazines for Libraries™ Update? Contact Cheryl LaGuardia.

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