Skip to main content
Woman walking on a sidewalk
What source do researchers consult when they want to know who earns more – men or women?  Or what is more popular – BBQ or Backgammon?  Or, on a serious note, how many people use the services of homeless shelters or what group is responsible for the most terrorist attacks?  When researchers think statistics, they think the Statistical Abstract of the United States.  ProQuest took over publishing of this resource with the 2013 edition and the 2016 edition was recently loaded into the database.  We will be hosting some upcoming webinars to review the new content added to the resource.  We hope you will join us for one of these 30 minute overview sessions.
Thursday, February 4th – 3 p.m. Eastern – Click here to register
Monday, February 15th – 11 a.m. Eastern – Click here to register
Here’s another interesting statistic – in the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global database there are over 11,000 papers that reference the Statistical Abstract of the United States.  Some of those titles include:
Cuellar, Steven S. 1998. "Private and Public Sector Expenditures on Social Welfare.". 
Oramas, Josefina E. 2013. "Adjusting to Divorce: A Case Study of Older Hispanic Adults in Miami-Dade.”
 
Shediak, Kimberly J. 2014. "Female Solo Entrepreneurs: A Phenomenological Study."
Strauss, David. 2013. "Home Security: The Psychological Threshold.”
The Statistical Abstract has been in existence for over 100 years so it has received a lot of coverage in the news.  Here’s a small selection of stories written about the Statistical Abstract, including one by Bill Bryson on the dangers of a common consumer products.  
"An Intimidating Volume is an Aid to Understanding." 1987.Chicago Tribune (1963-Current File), April 12, C3. 
"STATISTICAL ABSTRACT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR 1911 OUT.: Abstract shows Average Per Capita Wealth of Country has Grown from $307 in 1850 to Over $1,300 in 1904 Latest Recording made." 1912.Wall Street Journal (1889-1922), April 22, 3. 
BRYSON, BILL. 1999. "You See, Doctor, My Pillow Hit Me: Is Pajama Fracture Sweeping the Nation?" New York Times, F12. 
Samuelson, Robert J. 1996. "The Squeeze on Statistics: Accurate Numbers are Society's Eyes and Ears. we can't Afford Not to Know Them." The Washington Post (1974-Current File), December 4, A25.

By Sarah Palmer, Customer Experience Team Lead

What source do researchers consult when they want to know who earns more – men or women? Or what is more popular – BBQ or Backgammon? Or, on a serious note, how many people use the services of homeless shelters or what group is responsible for the most terrorist attacks?

When researchers think statistics, they think the Statistical Abstract of the United States. ProQuest took over publishing of this resource with the 2013 edition and the 2016 edition was recently loaded into the database. We will be hosting some upcoming webinars to review the new content added to the resource.

We hope you will join us for one of these 30-minute overview sessions.

Thursday, February 4th – 3 p.m. Eastern – Click here to register

Monday, February 15th – 11 a.m. Eastern – Click here to register

Here’s another interesting statistic – in the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global database there are over 11,000 papers that reference the Statistical Abstract of the United States. Some of those titles include:

Cuellar, Steven S. 1998. "Private and Public Sector Expenditures on Social Welfare." 

Oramas, Josefina E. 2013. "Adjusting to Divorce: A Case Study of Older Hispanic Adults in Miami-Dade.” 

Shediak, Kimberly J. 2014. "Female Solo Entrepreneurs: A Phenomenological Study."

Strauss, David. 2013. "Home Security: The Psychological Threshold.”

The Statistical Abstract has been in existence for over 100 years so it has received a lot of coverage in the news. Here’s a small selection of stories written about the Statistical Abstract, including one by Bill Bryson on the dangers of common consumer products.  

"An Intimidating Volume is an Aid to Understanding." 1987. Chicago Tribune (1963-Current File), April 12, C3. 

"STATISTICAL ABSTRACT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR 1911 OUT.: Abstract shows Average Per Capita Wealth of Country has Grown from $307 in 1850 to Over $1,300 in 1904 Latest Recording made." 1912. Wall Street Journal (1889-1922), April 22, 3. 

BRYSON, BILL. 1999. "You See, Doctor, My Pillow Hit Me: Is Pajama Fracture Sweeping the Nation?" New York Times, May 20, F12. 

Samuelson, Robert J. 1996. "The Squeeze on Statistics: Accurate Numbers are Society's Eyes and Ears. we can't Afford Not to Know Them." The Washington Post (1974-Current File), December 4, A25.

02 Feb 2016

Related Posts

Statistical Abstract of the United States, Library Journal Best Reference 2012, 2014 SIIA CODiE winner

2016 Edition of the Statistical Abstract of the United States Now Live

More than 1400 tables have been updated, and dozens of new tables reflecting the socio-economic condition of the United States are available.…

Learn More

ProQuest Statistical Abstract of the United States Infographic

Picture This! Statistics on Today’s Pressing Issues [Infographic]

Data on today’s hot topics from the ProQuest Statistical Abstract of the United States.…

Learn More

World map on grid with numbers

Stats & Datasets Content News You Can Use

The July 2015 Proquest Statistical & Datasets Products Content Update is focused on keeping you informed of tables, datasets, reports and other statistical content added and coming to your ProQuest Statistical products databases. In addition…

Learn More

Search the Blog

Archive

Follow