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Giving testimony
ProQuest partners with USC Shoah Foundation to Broaden Access to the Visual History Archive. 
Until now, libraries needed an Internet 2 connection and cache server to provide access to the 53,000 video testimonies from survivors and eyewitnesses of genocide collected in the USC Visual History Archive. As a result, this extraordinary resource was kept out of reach for many academic institutions and their researchers. 
Now ProQuest has partnered with the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education to distribute a streaming version of the Visual History Archive for dramatically improved access to more than 112,000+ hours of testimony from the Holocaust and other genocides, including Rwanda, Armenia and Nanjing. 
Oral histories enhance the historical record with personal thoughts, emotions and memories to provide critical insight that isn’t found in other resources. The scope of the content available exclusively in this collection empowers researchers to explore history via the voices of the people who were there.
Additional features of the Visual History Archive to benefit students, teachers and scholars in a wide variety of topics: 
- More than 63,000 manually-indexed search terms enable precision search and improves contextual discovery
- Interviews with subjects from 63 countries, in approximately 40 languages, providing a global look at the issue
- Transcripts of select interviews available, with additional transcriptions in progress
The Visual History Archive is an ongoing project with new interviews integrated yearly. In 2016, roughly 1,000 testimonies from the Cambodian and Guatemalan genocides as well as the Holocaust will be added. 
ProQuest will be offering trials of the streaming service for the Visual History Archive. 
Learn more.

ProQuest partners with USC Shoah Foundation to broaden access to the Visual History Archive 

Until now, libraries needed an Internet 2 connection and cache server to provide access to the 53,000 video testimonies from survivors and eyewitnesses of genocide collected in the USC Visual History Archive. As a result, this extraordinary resource was kept out of reach for many academic institutions and their researchers. 

Now ProQuest has partnered with the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education to distribute a streaming version of the Visual History Archive for dramatically improved access to more than 112,000+ hours of testimony from the Holocaust and other genocides, including Rwanda, Armenia, and Nanjing

Oral histories enhance the historical record with personal thoughts, emotions, and memories to provide critical insight that isn’t found in other resources. The scope of the content available exclusively in this collection empowers researchers to explore history via the voices of the people who were there.

Additional features of the Visual History Archive to benefit students, teachers, and scholars in a wide variety of topics: 

- More than 63,000 manually-indexed search terms enable precision search and improves contextual discovery

- Interviews with subjects from 63 countries, in approximately 40 languages, providing a global look at the issue

- Transcripts of select interviews available, with additional transcriptions in progress

The Visual History Archive is an ongoing project with new interviews integrated yearly. In 2016, roughly 1,000 testimonies from the Cambodian and Guatemalan genocides as well as the Holocaust will be added. 

ProQuest will be offering trials of the streaming service for the Visual History Archive. Learn more.

10 Aug 2016

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