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Pie chart: General impact of video on the learning experience
Critical insights and perspectives on history, from the people who lived it  
ACRL Webinar on August 18, 2:00-3:00 PM ET 
Join the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education and ProQuest for a free webinar to examine the impact video testimonies have in research and teaching.
The expanding role of video in education and research
An overwhelming majority – 93% – of respondents from all sectors of education indicated that video has a positive impact on the learning experience, according to a 2015 Kaltura State of Video in Education report.* 
When asked why video is proving to be such a valuable asset for students and scholars, respondents’ answers fell into a variety of themes, including:
- It reaches students who are accustomed to video and expect it in school
- Video is engaging and can enliven and enhance subject matter 
- It promotes connection between materials used in class and their context in the real world
The 2015 Kaltura Report also reveals that video is expected to play a significant role in the future of education. Going forward, educators see video becoming a standard, ubiquitous part of learning. It will be essential for content delivery, to encourage active learning, and to enable innovative types of learning, according to survey responses. 
Video testimonies from genocide survivors promote the human side of history
Providing access to quality video sources has never been more crucial for libraries.  
With this in mind, the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education partnered with ProQuest to provide a streaming version of the Visual History Archive to expand accessibility of this unparalleled resource. 
The USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive includes more than 53,000 video interviews with survivors and witnesses from the Holocaust, the Armenian Genocide, the Nanjing Massacre and the Rwandan Tutsi Genocide. 
Each testimony in the Visual History Archive averages about 2.5 hours in length and includes recollections of life before, during and after genocide to encompass the personal history of each person, compellingly recalled in their own words, in their own voices. 
These are the people who were there. Their testimonies promote a deeper understanding of the humans most intimately impacted by devastating world events. The thoughts, emotions and memories contained in these oral histories enhance the historical record by providing critical insight and perspectives that aren’t typically found in other research materials.
Using the Visual History Archive in Research and Learning
This one-of-a-kind content is digitized, fully-searchable, and hyperlinked to the minute, allowing students, professors and researchers to precisely retrieve testimonies and segments relevant to their areas of interest. 
The testimonies are filmed in 63 countries around the world, in approximately 40 languages. The archive also includes 700,000+ images, including photographs, documents, and works of art; as well as 1.8M names of prominent figures, family members and other people of importance to the interviewees. 
This content is used in 540+ courses across 25 disciplines around the world, such as history, journalism, religious studies, arts and letters, political science, Holocaust and Genocide studies, and many others. The Visual History Archive has been cited in 90+ published articles, 70+ published books and 60+ dissertations.
See how video testimonies are enhancing learning and research at academic institution around the world. Sign up now for "The Power of Video Testimonies: The Visual History Archive" webinar on August 18 featuring Douglass Ballman from the USC Shoah Foundation.
Learn more about the Visual History Archive.
* http://site.kaltura.com/rs/984-SDM-859/images/The_State_of_Video_in_Education_2015_a_Kaltura_Report.pdf

Critical insights and perspectives on history, from the people who lived it  

ACRL Webinar on August 18, 2:00-3:00 PM ET 

Join the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education and ProQuest for a free webinar to examine the impact video testimonies have in research and teaching.

The expanding role of video in education and research

An overwhelming majority – 93% – of respondents from all sectors of education indicated that video has a positive impact on the learning experience, according to a 2015 Kaltura State of Video in Education report.* 

When asked why video is proving to be such a valuable asset for students and scholars, respondents’ answers fell into a variety of themes, including:

- It reaches students who are accustomed to video and expect it in school

- Video is engaging and can enliven and enhance subject matter 

- It promotes connection between materials used in class and their context in the real world

The 2015 Kaltura Report also reveals that video is expected to play a significant role in the future of education. Going forward, educators see video becoming a standard, ubiquitous part of learning. It will be essential for content delivery, to encourage active learning, and to enable innovative types of learning, according to survey responses. 

Video testimonies from genocide survivors promote the human side of history

Providing access to quality video sources has never been more crucial for libraries.  

With this in mind, the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education partnered with ProQuest to provide a streaming version of the Visual History Archive to expand accessibility of this unparalleled resource. 

The USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive includes more than 53,000 video interviews with survivors and witnesses from the Holocaust, the Armenian Genocide, the Nanjing Massacre and the Rwandan Tutsi Genocide. 

Each testimony in the Visual History Archive averages about 2.5 hours in length and includes recollections of life before, during and after genocide to encompass the personal history of each person, compellingly recalled in their own words, in their own voices. 

These are the people who were there. Their testimonies promote a deeper understanding of the humans most intimately impacted by devastating world events. The thoughts, emotions, and memories contained in these oral histories enhance the historical record by providing critical insight and perspectives that aren’t typically found in other research materials.

Using the Visual History Archive in research and learning

This one-of-a-kind content is digitized, fully-searchable, and hyperlinked to the minute, allowing students, professors, and researchers to precisely retrieve testimonies and segments relevant to their areas of interest. 

The testimonies are filmed in 63 countries around the world, in approximately 40 languages. The archive also includes 700,000+ images, including photographs, documents, and works of art; as well as 1.8M names of prominent figures, family members and other people of importance to the interviewees. 

Content from the Visual History Archive is used in 540+ courses across 25 disciplines around the world, such as history, journalism, religious studies, arts and letters, political science, Holocaust and Genocide studies, and many others. The Archive has also been cited in 90+ published articles, 70+ published books, and 60+ dissertations.

See how video testimonies are enhancing learning and research at academic institution around the world. Sign up now for "The Power of Video Testimonies: The Visual History Archive" webinar on August 18 featuring Douglass Ballman from the USC Shoah Foundation.

Learn more about the Visual History Archive.

* http://site.kaltura.com/rs/984-SDM-859/images/The_State_of_Video_in_Education_2015_a_Kaltura_Report.pdf

09 Aug 2016

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