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Curated by Sarah Palmer, Customer Experience Supervisor
Students turning to the open web for statistical coverage of the 2016 presidential race are bombarded with information – some credible, some not.
With high-impact assignments at stake, these researchers should not have to spend extra time wondering what search terms will get the most accurate and relevant results – then examining their content to distinguish fact from speculation, or determine bias in their sources.
An institution that subscribes to ProQuest Statistical Insight gives students the kind of trend coverage they won’t easily find elsewhere. This dynamically updated database delivers statistics collected from the most reputable sources: U.S. federal agencies, states, private organizations and major intergovernmental organizations. The results include licensed content not found on the open web.
What do the numbers say (so far) about the 2016 race?
In Statistical Insights researchers easily search and browse for statistics that add credibility, provide historical context and support their conclusions.
For example, Statistical Insight offers thought-provoking public-opinion research from respected sources:
- A Pew Research Center report from February 2016 breaks down which media sources different age groups use to get their presidential campaign news. Cable television was cited as the “most helpful” source among people age 65 and older; contrasted to social media, the “most helpful” medium for adults age 18-29.
- As of January 2016, “Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters [saw] several GOP candidates as potentially good or great presidents,” according to Pew Research Center. “A majority (56%) of Republican voters say Donald Trump would make a good or great president, while 22% say he would be poor or terrible.”
- On the Democratic side, an April 2016 McClatchy-Maris poll of nearly 1300 adults – garnered via live interviews from both landline and mobile phones – found a virtual dead heat, with Senator Bernie Sanders and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton separated by just two percentage points. 
- Also by April 2016, another McClatchy-Maris survey confirms that voters on both sides of the aisle are more motivated by their dislike of the other-party candidate than their positive feeling for their own front-runner: “53% of Clinton’s supporters say their vote is one of opposition to Trump and not in support of Clinton. Among Trump’s supporters, a similar pattern exists. More than six in ten, 61%, report they choose Trump because they are against Clinton.”
Access to these publications is based on your library’s subscription to ProQuest Statistical Insight.  If you would like training for Statistical Insight, or would like to review your library’s content, email training@proquest.com.

Curated by Sarah Palmer, Customer Experience Supervisor

Students turning to the open web for statistical coverage of the 2016 presidential race are bombarded with information – some credible, some not.

With high-impact assignments at stake, these researchers should not have to spend extra time wondering what search terms will get the most accurate and relevant results – then examining their content to distinguish fact from speculation, or determine bias in their sources.

An institution that subscribes to ProQuest Statistical Insight gives students the kind of trend coverage they won’t easily find elsewhere. This dynamically updated database delivers statistics collected from the most reputable sources: U.S. federal agencies, states, private organizations and major intergovernmental organizations. The results include licensed content not found on the open web.

What do the numbers say (so far) about the 2016 race?

In Statistical Insight researchers easily search and browse for statistics that add credibility, provide historical context and support their conclusions.

For example, Statistical Insight offers thought-provoking public-opinion research from respected sources:

- A Pew Research Center report from February 2016 breaks down which media sources different age groups use to get their presidential campaign news. Cable television was cited as the “most helpful” source among people age 65 and older; contrasted to social media, the “most helpful” medium for adults age 18-29.

- As of January 2016, “Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters [saw] several GOP candidates as potentially good or great presidents,” according to Pew Research Center. “A majority (56%) of Republican voters say Donald Trump would make a good or great president, while 22% say he would be poor or terrible.”

- On the Democratic side, an April 2016 McClatchy-Maris poll of nearly 1300 adults – garnered via live interviews from both landline and mobile phones – found a virtual dead heat, with Senator Bernie Sanders and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton separated by just two percentage points. 

- Also by April 2016, another McClatchy-Maris survey confirms that voters on both sides of the aisle are more motivated by their dislike of the other-party candidate than their positive feeling for their own front-runner: “53% of Clinton’s supporters say their vote is one of opposition to Trump and not in support of Clinton. Among Trump’s supporters, a similar pattern exists. More than six in ten, 61%, report they choose Trump because they are against Clinton.”

Access to these publications is based on your library’s subscription to ProQuest Statistical Insight.  If you would like training for Statistical Insight, or would like to review your library’s content, email training@proquest.com.

12 May 2016

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