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Knowledgebase: Integrate, Enhance, Share
Second in the “What’s this I hear about a new knowledgebase?” blog series, this piece highlights how the new ProQuest knowledgebase sets the stage for improved discovery and management services. 
In the first blog post of this series we highlighted the importance of moving forward and developing a new ProQuest knowledgebase. There is still a need for reliable, enriched and curated resource metadata that is centrally maintained on behalf of libraries. There is value in what a knowledgebase can do for librarians and researchers, in terms of better managing and facilitating access to resources. There is opportunity to design around four key areas (scope, scale, systems, and services) to meet evolving collections, changing needs and increased expectations.  
How does this knowledgebase benefit your library? We like to highlight the benefits across four key areas which are characteristics of an in-depth knowledgebase: 
- The entire collection is supported – electronic, print, digital, microform
- New and emerging business models are supported – DDA, Open Access, Perpetual Access Licenses
- Data from many sources, integrated and shared – Local, consortium, linked and networked data
- No physical migration is required – This is an evolution, a transformation – not a migration
Our customers have told us that librarians and researchers – and the library industry at large -- need the kind of in-depth knowledgebase that is designed to successfully support the future of libraries and research. 
ProQuest is uniquely positioned to deliver on this promise by bringing together its unique set of assets and solutions, which are founded upon authoritative information about library and information resources. Today, this authoritative metadata – about many different types of resources – is being integrated with our foundational e-resource metadata – to create our richer, more comprehensive knowledgebase. 
The integration transforms the knowledgebase into an information ecosystem that breaks through the “containers”  where valuable data has been historically stored or closed off, bringing everything together in a single, integrated cloud-based repository from which it can be shared across ProQuest products and services. The graphic below is a very simple illustration of the way in which we’re building the new ProQuest Knowledgebase to support your collections and researchers.
 
Let’s take a closer look at each stage highlighted above:
- Integrate: We are building the new ProQuest Knowledgebase on the foundation of our two complementary metadata authorities – KnowledgeWorks, our e-resource metadata repository and Ulrich’s, our global serials directory. Integrating KnowledgeWorks and Ulrich’s creates a comprehensive store of rich bibliographic, provider, and publisher information – to which we’re adding new sources such as metadata from national libraries’ MARC records and metadata about digital resources.
- Enhance:  We’ve brought this authoritative metadata together in a new, relational data model. We’re using IFLA’s Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (also known as “FRBR”) as a high-level framework and reference point for relating resources to one another in the new model.  We’re also building new “low touch” tools for ProQuest’s metadata librarians and Content Managers that will allow them to work with all content types we need to be able to gather, curate, and update.  Our new Knowledgebase systems allow new data points to be collected and enhanced – and give us the ability to track and report on resource changes over time, in ways that were not possible before.
- Share: This integrated and transformed data can be shared across our products through a Knowledgebase API with web services that specialize in different types of metadata enrichment and delivery.
Through this integrated ProQuest Knowledgebase, you’ll continue to benefit from our centrally managed and curated data – that benefits all of our customers at once through our Software as a Service (or “SaaS”) model.
The next blog post in our series will examine how the new ProQuest Knowledgebase will make the necessary resource connections to support interoperability, transform library workflows, and improve discovery and access of collections. 

By Yvette Diven, Product Manager Lead, Resource Management

Second in the “What’s this I hear about a new knowledgebase?” blog series, this piece highlights how the new ProQuest knowledgebase sets the stage for improved discovery and management services. 

In the first blog post of this series we highlighted the importance of moving forward and developing a new ProQuest knowledgebase. There is still a need for reliable, enriched and curated resource metadata that is centrally maintained on behalf of libraries. There is value in what a knowledgebase can do for librarians and researchers, in terms of better managing and facilitating access to resources. There is opportunity to design around four key areas (scope, scale, systems, and services) to meet evolving collections, changing needs and increased expectations.  

How does this knowledgebase benefit your library? We like to highlight the benefits across four key areas which are characteristics of an in-depth knowledgebase: 

- The entire collection is supported – electronic, print, digital, microform

- New and emerging business models are supported – DDA, Open Access, Perpetual Access Licenses

- Data from many sources, integrated and shared – Local, consortium, linked and networked data

- No physical migration is required – This is an evolution, a transformation – not a migration

Our customers have told us that librarians and researchers – and the library industry at large -- need the kind of in-depth knowledgebase that is designed to successfully support the future of libraries and research. 

ProQuest is uniquely positioned to deliver on this promise by bringing together its unique set of assets and solutions, which are founded upon authoritative information about library and information resources. Today, this authoritative metadata – about many different types of resources – is being integrated with our foundational e-resource metadata – to create our richer, more comprehensive knowledgebase. 

The integration transforms the knowledgebase into an information ecosystem that breaks through the “containers”  where valuable data has been historically stored or closed off, bringing everything together in a single, integrated cloud-based repository from which it can be shared across ProQuest products and services. The graphic above is a very simple illustration of the way in which we’re building the new ProQuest Knowledgebase to support your collections and researchers. 

Let’s take a closer look at each stage highlighted in the graphic:

- Integrate: We are building the new ProQuest Knowledgebase on the foundation of our two complementary metadata authorities – KnowledgeWorks, our e-resource metadata repository and Ulrich’s, our global serials directory. Integrating KnowledgeWorks and Ulrich’s creates a comprehensive store of rich bibliographic, provider, and publisher information – to which we’re adding new sources such as metadata from national libraries’ MARC records and metadata about digital resources.

- Enhance:  We’ve brought this authoritative metadata together in a new, relational data model. We’re using IFLA’s Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (also known as “FRBR”) as a high-level framework and reference point for relating resources to one another in the new model.  We’re also building new “low touch” tools for ProQuest’s metadata librarians and Content Managers that will allow them to work with all content types we need to be able to gather, curate, and update.  Our new Knowledgebase systems allow new data points to be collected and enhanced – and give us the ability to track and report on resource changes over time, in ways that were not possible before.

- Share: This integrated and transformed data can be shared across our products through a Knowledgebase API with web services that specialize in different types of metadata enrichment and delivery.

Through this integrated ProQuest Knowledgebase, you’ll continue to benefit from our centrally managed and curated data – that benefits all of our customers at once through our Software as a Service (or “SaaS”) model.

The next blog post in our series will examine how the new ProQuest Knowledgebase will make the necessary resource connections to support interoperability, transform library workflows, and improve discovery and access of collections. 

12 Feb 2016

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