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John F. Kennedy, Jr., Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford
Convention speeches.
Stump speeches.
Townhalls.
Over the next few months, the presidential nominees from the Democratic Party and the Republican Party will be campaigning across the United States making speeches promoting their platform.
In this blog post, we look back at two speeches by two very different candidates separated by eight years. Despite their strong differences as politicians, portions of these speeches discuss similar themes. 
Can you name the candidates who gave these speeches and the year in which they gave them? 
Join the Twitter polls to share your answer for the first speech and second speech. 
Who gave this speech? Tell us in the Twitter poll. 
Our free government and our system stand tonight as the most stable and the most successful in the history of man. This is not a victory of Party or of politicians -- or even of Presidents. America's great success is the achievement of the American people. For the American people, this year is a year of great decision. For the 45th time since our great Republic was born, these free people will freely decide the direction that they want America to move. Whatever our allegiance politically, whatever our interests privately, whatever our concerns personally, we must not let our year of decision become our year of division.
The first stated purpose of those who gave the Constitution to us was "to form a more perfect union." That tonight is still our first purpose. If we are to establish justice, to ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty for ourselves and for our posterity, we must labor together to make this Nation whole and this people one.
So long as there has been an America, there have always been white and black, red and brown -- Protestant and Catholic, Quaker and Jew – Germans and Dutch, Italian and Swede, rich and poor, capital and labor. And I would remind you good people tonight that these distinctions have never stood in our way -- and they do not stand in our way tonight.
The one division that our forefathers most feared, the division that they warned us against, was the division of extreme factionalism. Jefferson warned against it, Hamilton and Madison warned against it. And in his first Farewell Address, the first President, George Washington, warned against it, warned against allowing parties to become "Northern and Southern, Atlantic and Western". He told us to beware of that kind of partisanship which, in his words, "agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, "...kindles the animosity of one party against another, "...foments occasionally riot and insurrection."
Well, my Fellow Countrymen, … those are words and those are warnings that all responsible Americans must remember. From the election of 1789 to the election of 1960, the choices for the American Presidency have never meant changes in the broad purposes of the American people. But that is not the choice this year. There are abroad in this responsible land reckless factions, contemptuous toward the will of majorities; callous toward the plight of minorities; arrogant toward allies; belligerent toward adversaries; careless toward peace. These factions wear many names. They espouse many causes. Standing together they confront the American people and they demand that you make the choice. They demand that you choose a doctrine that is alien to America -- that would lead to a tragic convulsion in our foreign relations; a doctrine that flaunts the unity of our society and searches for scapegoats among our people. It is a doctrine that invites extremism to take over our land. It is a doctrine that plays loosely with human destiny -- and this generation of Americans will have no part of it. 
I have great faith in the American people. They are neither sick in spirit nor faint in moral courage. They have never been more capable of choosing for themselves what they think is right or wrong. They will reject a spirit of party which Washington once said "agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, or kindles the animosity of one party against another."
Those are the words of the first President. But I believe that spirit must be the spirit of the next President, and every President who follows him. … 
The position of your President is clear. The policies of my Party are clear. We intend to keep America prosperous, powerful and unafraid, unafraid to stand against any enemy in the defense of freedom, and unafraid to sit at any table in pursuit of honorable peace. We intend to keep America united. We intend to keep America free and undivided. We intend to keep America a land of free labor, a land of free enterprise, a land where all free people alike will respect the law and the law respects the people. We are a nation of lovers and not a nation of haters. We are a land of good homes and good schools, decent wages and decent medical care for the aged. Yes, we want a land of hope and happiness, but never a land of harshness and hate. Are these your goals? Is this your spirit? Is this the America that you want to produce and that you want to see, and that you want to fight for?
Who gave this speech? Tell us in the Twitter Poll
This nation proudly calls itself the United States of America. Let us reject any philosophy which would make us the divided people of America.
In that spirit, I address you my fellow Americans tonight not as a partisan of party, which would automatically divide us but as a partisan of principles which can unite us. … 
I ask you to join us, not in a coalition held together only by a desire to gain power. I ask you to join us as members of a new American majority bound together by our common ideals.
I ask everyone listening to me tonight -- Democrats, Republicans and Independents, to join our new majority -- not on the basis of the party label you wear on your lapel but what you believe in your hearts. …
I have traveled to 80 countries in the past 25 years. I have seen communist systems, socialist systems and systems half free and half socialist.
Every time I return home I realize how fortunate we are to live in America.
This is a great and a good country.
We have more freedom, more opportunity and more prosperity than any people in the world. … 
I turn now to an issue of overriding importance, not only in this election but for generations to come - the progress we have made in building a structure of peace in the world.
Peace is too important for partisanship. There have been five Presidents in my voting lifetime - Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson.
They had differences on some issues.
But they were united in their belief that where the security of America and the peace of the world are involved, we are not Republicans, we are not Democrats. We are Americans. 
They were united in their total opposition to isolation for America and in their belief that the interests of the United States and the interests of world peace require that America be strong enough and intelligent enough to assume the responsibilities of leadership in the world community.
They were united in their conviction that the United States should have a defense second to none in the world. 
They were all men who hated war and who were dedicated to peace. …
As your President I shall always uphold that proud bipartisan tradition.
Join the Twitter polls to share your answer for the first speech and second speech. 
Source: ProQuest History Vault, American Politics and Society from Kennedy to Watergate. Learn more.

UPDATE August 15, 2016: The Twitter polls are closed but you can still guess which presidential nominee gave each speech - John F. Kennedy; Lyndon Johnson; Richard Nixon; or Gerald Ford.

Scroll to the bottom for the answers.

Convention speeches.

Stump speeches.

Townhalls.

Over the next few months, the presidential nominees from the Democratic Party and the Republican Party will be campaigning across the United States making speeches promoting their platform.

In this blog post, we look back at two speeches by two very different candidates separated by eight years. Despite their strong differences as politicians, portions of these speeches discuss similar themes. 

Can you name the candidates who gave these speeches and the year in which they gave them?  

Who gave this speech? Scroll down for the answer.

Our free government and our system stand tonight as the most stable and the most successful in the history of man. This is not a victory of Party or of politicians -- or even of Presidents. America's great success is the achievement of the American people. For the American people, this year is a year of great decision. For the 45th time since our great Republic was born, these free people will freely decide the direction that they want America to move. Whatever our allegiance politically, whatever our interests privately, whatever our concerns personally, we must not let our year of decision become our year of division.

The first stated purpose of those who gave the Constitution to us was "to form a more perfect union." That tonight is still our first purpose. If we are to establish justice, to ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty for ourselves and for our posterity, we must labor together to make this Nation whole and this people one.

So long as there has been an America, there have always been white and black, red and brown -- Protestant and Catholic, Quaker and Jew – Germans and Dutch, Italian and Swede, rich and poor, capital and labor. And I would remind you good people tonight that these distinctions have never stood in our way -- and they do not stand in our way tonight.

The one division that our forefathers most feared, the division that they warned us against, was the division of extreme factionalism. Jefferson warned against it, Hamilton and Madison warned against it. And in his first Farewell Address, the first President, George Washington, warned against it, warned against allowing parties to become "Northern and Southern, Atlantic and Western". He told us to beware of that kind of partisanship which, in his words, "agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, "...kindles the animosity of one party against another, "...foments occasionally riot and insurrection."

Well, my Fellow Countrymen, … those are words and those are warnings that all responsible Americans must remember. From the election of 1789 to the election of 1960, the choices for the American Presidency have never meant changes in the broad purposes of the American people. But that is not the choice this year. There are abroad in this responsible land reckless factions, contemptuous toward the will of majorities; callous toward the plight of minorities; arrogant toward allies; belligerent toward adversaries; careless toward peace. These factions wear many names. They espouse many causes. Standing together they confront the American people and they demand that you make the choice. They demand that you choose a doctrine that is alien to America -- that would lead to a tragic convulsion in our foreign relations; a doctrine that flaunts the unity of our society and searches for scapegoats among our people. It is a doctrine that invites extremism to take over our land. It is a doctrine that plays loosely with human destiny -- and this generation of Americans will have no part of it. 

I have great faith in the American people. They are neither sick in spirit nor faint in moral courage. They have never been more capable of choosing for themselves what they think is right or wrong. They will reject a spirit of party which Washington once said "agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, or kindles the animosity of one party against another."

Those are the words of the first President. But I believe that spirit must be the spirit of the next President, and every President who follows him. … 

The position of your President is clear. The policies of my Party are clear. We intend to keep America prosperous, powerful and unafraid, unafraid to stand against any enemy in the defense of freedom, and unafraid to sit at any table in pursuit of honorable peace. We intend to keep America united. We intend to keep America free and undivided. We intend to keep America a land of free labor, a land of free enterprise, a land where all free people alike will respect the law and the law respects the people. We are a nation of lovers and not a nation of haters. We are a land of good homes and good schools, decent wages and decent medical care for the aged. Yes, we want a land of hope and happiness, but never a land of harshness and hate. Are these your goals? Is this your spirit? Is this the America that you want to produce and that you want to see, and that you want to fight for?

Who gave this speech? Scroll down for the answer.

This nation proudly calls itself the United States of America. Let us reject any philosophy which would make us the divided people of America.

In that spirit, I address you my fellow Americans tonight not as a partisan of party, which would automatically divide us but as a partisan of principles which can unite us. … 

I ask you to join us, not in a coalition held together only by a desire to gain power. I ask you to join us as members of a new American majority bound together by our common ideals.

I ask everyone listening to me tonight -- Democrats, Republicans, and Independents, to join our new majority -- not on the basis of the party label you wear on your lapel but what you believe in your hearts.

I have traveled to 80 countries in the past 25 years. I have seen communist systems, socialist systems,and systems half free and half socialist.

Every time I return home I realize how fortunate we are to live in America.

This is a great and a good country.

We have more freedom, more opportunity, and more prosperity than any people in the world. … 

I turn now to an issue of overriding importance, not only in this election but for generations to come - the progress we have made in building a structure of peace in the world.

Peace is too important for partisanship. There have been five Presidents in my voting lifetime - Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson.

They had differences on some issues.

But they were united in their belief that where the security of America and the peace of the world are involved, we are not Republicans, we are not Democrats. We are Americans. 

They were united in their total opposition to isolation for America and in their belief that the interests of the United States and the interests of world peace require that America be strong enough and intelligent enough to assume the responsibilities of leadership in the world community.They were united in their conviction that the United States should have a defense second to none in the world. 

They were all men who hated war and who were dedicated to peace. …

As your President, I shall always uphold that proud bipartisan tradition. 

Answers:

Speech 1: Lyndon Johnson, 1964

Speech 2: Richard Nixon, 1972

Source: ProQuest History Vault, American Politics and Society from Kennedy to Watergate. Learn more.

08 Aug 2016

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