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It’s been just over four months since we announced our commitment to securely connecting you and your users to ProQuest systems; now we’re approaching the final phase when we’ll “sunset” our support of the legacy HTTP protocol and require connection to ProQuest systems with the more secure version, HTTPS.
As of June 30, 2017, the ProQuest platform will require the use HTTPS for all search and document retrieval requests. Before then, make sure your proxies and document links are adjusted. 
- If your library uses proxies to access ProQuest, there is some work to be done before  June 30 to update links and certificates to support HTTPS. For instructions on how to complete these changes in common proxy servers, see this support article (link).
- If your library accesses ProQuest content directly (not via proxy), begin the process to review and convert links to ProQuest content to their HTTPS versions exclusively to ensure your patrons are best protected as they research.
In addition to those systems announced in January, several additional ones now support HTTPS including Pivot, ProQuest Congressional and many of our K-12 offerings.  Ebook Central and other systems will also be ending their support of HTTP throughout the remainder of 2017. 
For the full list of timing for the sunset of HTTP across all ProQuest products, review this support article (LINK), which will be regularly updated as dates are confirmed. Stay apprised easily by subscribing to the article series to be notified of changes.
Begin using HTTPS as your primary means of connecting to all enabled ProQuest systems now, so that you and your users are best protected right away. This will also prepare you for the coming end of support for HTTP.
“HTTPS Everywhere”
Browser makers are driving toward a more secure Internet that leverages HTTPS as widely as possible. You will notice changes in common browsers continuing to drive the message of “HTTPS Everywhere” to users as they browse the Internet. For example, Google will update their Chrome browsers (link: https://blog.chromium.org/2017/04/next-steps-toward-more-connection.html) in October. The browser will note web page that use HTTP to submit information as “Not Secure,” making users more obviously aware when they are sending information across an unencrypted connection.  
As protectors of privacy and champions of security, the library is a great partner to bring this message to users.
Need more info or help?
Reach out to the ProQuest customer experience team or your account representative for answers to questions or concerns about this final stage of the HTTPS cutover.  Increasing the security of the Internet benefits us all, and these changes are key to ensuring that the searches your users and patrons execute on ProQuest systems are private from end to end. 

By Daniel Ayala, Director, Global Information Security, ProQuest

It’s been just over four months since we announced our commitment to securely connecting you and your users to ProQuest systems; now we’re approaching the final phase when we’ll “sunset” our support of the legacy HTTP protocol and require connection to ProQuest systems with the more secure version, HTTPS.

As of June 30, 2017, the ProQuest platform will require the use of HTTPS for all search and document retrieval requests. Before then, make sure your proxies and document links are adjusted.

  • - If your library uses proxies to access ProQuest, there is some work to be done before  June 30 to update links and certificates to support HTTPS. For instructions on how to complete these changes in common proxy servers, see this support article.

  • - If your library accesses ProQuest content directly (not via proxy), begin the process to review and convert links to ProQuest content to their HTTPS versions exclusively to ensure your patrons are best protected as they research.

In addition to those systems announced in January, several additional ones now support HTTPS including Pivot, ProQuest Congressional and many of our K-12 offerings. Ebook Central and other systems will also be ending their support of HTTP throughout the remainder of 2017. 

For the full list of timing for the sunset of HTTP across all ProQuest products, review this support article, which will be regularly updated as dates are confirmed. Stay apprised easily by subscribing to the article series to be notified of changes.

Begin using HTTPS as your primary means of connecting to all enabled ProQuest systems now, so that you and your users are best protected right away. This will also prepare you for the coming end of support for HTTP.

“HTTPS Everywhere”

Browser makers are driving toward a more secure Internet that leverages HTTPS as widely as possible. You will notice changes in common browsers continuing to drive the message of “HTTPS Everywhere” to users as they browse the Internet. For example, Google will update their Chrome browsers in October. The browser will note web pages that use HTTP to submit information as “Not Secure,” making users more obviously aware when they are sending information across an unencrypted connection.  

As protectors of privacy and champions of security, the library is a great partner to bring this message to users.

Need more info or help?

Reach out to the ProQuest customer experience team or your account representative for answers to questions or concerns about this final stage of the HTTPS cutover. Increasing the security of the Internet benefits us all, and these changes are key to ensuring that the searches your users and patrons execute on ProQuest systems are private from end to end. 

23 May 2017

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