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Primary sources for researchers highlighted in upcoming webinar about Women’s and Black Freedom movements
How have historical social movements taken shape? What did they accomplish? And how does past activism influence events unfolding today? 
ProQuest invites you learn why primary source materials are essential in helping researchers explore these and similar questions related to social movement scholarship. 
Sign up for our special ACLR Webinar on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 at 2pm eastern.
Join the historians who have curated unique, award-winning collections for ProQuest and Alexander Street as they provide an overview of these resources – encompassing a vast amount of content unavailable anywhere else – and share insights from their own research experiences. 
An unparalleled breadth of critical content
The upcoming webinar delves into unique and award-winning resources available from ProQuest that can provide researchers with deeper understanding and more acute insights into the scope, evolution and intersection of the Women’s and Black Freedom movements.  
 The session kicks off with discussion from Thomas Dublin and Kathryn Sklar, the co-editors of the acclaimed Women in Social Movements series for Alexander Street, which encompasses “Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000,” “Women and Social Movements, International, 1840 to Present” and the recently released “Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires Since 1820.”
Thomas Dublin and Kathryn Sklar will discuss how they curated the three collections and contextualized primary sources for teaching and research. They will also highlight how this latest collection on Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires, that includes several individual micro-collections of documents on key topics, edited by an expert in each field of study, is paving the way for new scholarship. It sheds light on the intersection of the Women’s and Black Freedom movements by seeing it through the eyes of women in modern empires. 
Organizing the collection in clusters allows Dublin and Sklar to collaborate with distinguished faculty and librarians in particular subjects within women’s history to aggregate the most comprehensive body of primary source materials, including books, video, and documents such as journals, institutional records, personal letters and diaries, photographs and more.  
Following the discussion of Alexander Street’s Women and Social Movements databases, Daniel Lewis, ProQuest Senior Product Manager, leads an exploration into primary sources related to the Black Freedom Movement in the History Vault collections. His presentation culminates in a discussion of the contribution of women to the Black Freedom Struggle of the 20th Century, as documented by women’s rights and civil rights materials in ProQuest History Vault, including court documents, government files, personal correspondence and much more.
In addition to the tremendous breadth of information gathered in these resources, webinar participants will learn about how the content of these archives is indexed and enhanced for simplified discoverability and more effective, efficient research results. 
The value of studying social movements
“Participants in social movements have literally changed the world,” said Lewis in regard to the enduring appeal of studies in the Women’s and Black Freedom movements. 
“There is so much more to explore in these fields, for historians, for students, and for people currently involved in a movement, to learn about the past or to improve their own lives and the lives of others,” he continued.  
“Just consider the impressive research that has already taken place on past social movements, and how each generation of scholars confronts new questions and contributes new insights,” he explained. 
“ProQuest has digitized a wide body of primary sources that can be used by today’s researchers to answer questions such why do social movements take place in particular times and places? How do they spread? What do they mean to the participants? What are the rhythms of persistence and decline?”
According to Lewis, researchers at all levels who use primary sources to study social movements have the potential to promote our collective understanding of the nature of social movements, and the power of people to change our world.
Learn more about the presenters and register today for our ACRL webinar on March 28, 2017: How Does the Past Inform Today? Key Primary Source Collections for Research in Social Movements

Primary sources for researchers highlighted in upcoming webinar about Women’s and Black Freedom movements

How have historical social movements taken shape? What did they accomplish? And how does past activism influence events unfolding today? 

ProQuest invites you learn why primary source materials are essential in helping researchers explore these and similar questions related to social movement scholarship. 

Sign up for our special ACLR Webinar on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 at 2pm eastern.

Join the historians who have curated unique, award-winning collections for ProQuest and Alexander Street as they provide an overview of these resources – encompassing a vast amount of content unavailable anywhere else – and share insights from their own research experiences. 

An unparalleled breadth of critical content

The upcoming webinar delves into unique and award-winning resources available from ProQuest that can provide researchers with deeper understanding and more acute insights into the scope, evolution and intersection of the Women’s and Black Freedom movements.  

The session kicks off with discussion from Thomas Dublin and Kathryn Sklar, the co-editors of the acclaimed Women in Social Movements series for Alexander Street, which encompasses “Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000,” “Women and Social Movements, International, 1840 to Present” and the recently released “Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires Since 1820.”

Thomas Dublin and Kathryn Sklar will discuss how they curated the three collections and contextualized primary sources for teaching and research. They will also highlight how this latest collection on Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires, that includes several individual micro-collections of documents on key topics, edited by an expert in each field of study, is paving the way for new scholarship. It sheds light on the intersection of the Women’s and Black Freedom movements by seeing it through the eyes of women in modern empires. 

Organizing the collection in clusters allows Dublin and Sklar to collaborate with distinguished faculty and librarians in particular subjects within women’s history to aggregate the most comprehensive body of primary source materials, including books, video, and documents such as journals, institutional records, personal letters and diaries, photographs and more.  

Following the discussion of Alexander Street’s Women and Social Movements databases, Daniel Lewis, ProQuest Senior Product Manager, leads an exploration into primary sources related to the Black Freedom Movement in the History Vault collections. His presentation culminates in a discussion of the contribution of women to the Black Freedom Struggle of the 20th Century, as documented by women’s rights and civil rights materials in ProQuest History Vault, including court documents, government files, personal correspondence and much more.

In addition to the tremendous breadth of information gathered in these resources, webinar participants will learn about how the content of these archives is indexed and enhanced for simplified discoverability and more effective, efficient research results. 

The value of studying social movements

“Participants in social movements have literally changed the world,” said Lewis in regard to the enduring appeal of studies in the Women’s and Black Freedom movements. 

“There is so much more to explore in these fields, for historians, for students, and for people currently involved in a movement, to learn about the past or to improve their own lives and the lives of others,” he continued.  

“Just consider the impressive research that has already taken place on past social movements, and how each generation of scholars confronts new questions and contributes new insights,” he explained. 

“ProQuest has digitized a wide body of primary sources that can be used by today’s researchers to answer questions such why do social movements take place in particular times and places? How do they spread? What do they mean to the participants? What are the rhythms of persistence and decline?”

According to Lewis, researchers at all levels who use primary sources to study social movements have the potential to promote our collective understanding of the nature of social movements, and the power of people to change our world.

Learn more about the presenters and register today for our ACRL webinar on March 28, 2017: How Does the Past Inform Today? Key Primary Source Collections for Research in Social Movements.

09 Feb 2017

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