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Overview

The personal and business papers contained in this collection relate primarily to the Smith family of Medford, Boston, and Weymouth, Massachusetts. The collection is particularly rich in the political history of the Revolutionary era, as represented by the activities of Isaac Smith, Jr. (1749-1829), a Loyalist who fled to England during the war and returned to the United States in 1784 seeking reinstatement of his citizenship.

In addition, there are volumes of private correspondence and papers pertaining to the family's shipping and mercantile enterprises in Boston. Also contained in the collection is material pertaining to the related Carter, Bernard, Boylston, Otis, and Pickman families, as well as letters of Abigail (Smith) and John Adams, and their son, John Quincy Adams.

Titles from the Massachusetts Historical Society Collections may be purchased by individual reel.

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