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A study reveals that many academic researchers are time-deprived, stressed and struggling with data and measurement – but that academic libraries and research offices can help

“Many researchers conduct tasks themselves in areas where libraries and research offices can provide valuable expertise and administrative support.”

That’s just one of the findings in a new study commissioned by Ex Libris, a ProQuest company, which examines the challenges that higher-education researchers confront – and the level of support provided by research offices and academic libraries.

The report presents findings from a survey of 300 researchers and interviews with nine senior members of research offices in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia. The study was conducted by Alterline, an independent research agency.

A few of the study’s key findings:

Researchers are satisfied with the level of support provided by their research office and library, but they still feel time-deprived and stressed.
Fund sourcing and grant applications are the most difficult parts of their roles.
Demonstrating research impact is increasingly important, but the best method of meaningfully measuring it is still unclear to most.
Almost 60% of scholars are required to publish research datasets alongside their publications – yet for many, this is not easily achieved.
Many researchers conduct their own tasks in areas where libraries and research offices can provide expertise and support.

You can read the full study here.

A study reveals that many academic researchers are time-deprived, stressed and struggling with data and measurement – but that academic libraries and research offices can help

 

“Many researchers conduct tasks themselves in areas where libraries and research offices can provide valuable expertise and administrative support.”

That’s just one of the findings in a new study commissioned by Ex Libris, a ProQuest company, which examines the challenges that higher-education researchers confront – and the level of support provided by research offices and academic libraries.

The report presents findings from a survey of 300 researchers and interviews with nine senior members of research offices in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia. The study was conducted by Alterline, an independent research agency.

A few of the study’s key findings:

·        Researchers are satisfied with the level of support provided by their research office and library, but they still feel time-deprived and stressed.

·        Fund sourcing and grant applications are the most difficult parts of their roles.

·        Demonstrating research impact is increasingly important, but the best method of meaningfully measuring it is still unclear to most.

·        Almost 60% of scholars are required to publish research datasets alongside their publications – yet for many, this is not easily achieved.

·        Many researchers conduct their own tasks in areas where libraries and research offices can provide expertise and support.

You can read the full study here.

24 Jul 2019

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