Abstract/Details

Birthing Outside the System: Wanting the best and safest. A grounded theory study about what motivates women to choose a high-risk homebirth or freebirth

Jackson, Melanie Kathleen. 
 University of Western Sydney (Australia) ProQuest Dissertations Publishing,  2014. 10309903.

Abstract (summary)

Childbirth in Australia occurs largely in a medicalised context, with 96.9% of births occurring in hospital, 2.2% in birth centres and 0.4% at home as planned homebirths (Li, Zeki, Hilder, & Sullivan, 2013). Only a small percentage of women choose to birth outside the system – that is, have no midwife present (freebirth), or elect to have a homebirth with medical risk factors. In Australia, women with risk factors have little choice but to birth in hospital under obstetric care as they are often excluded from midwifery care programs, birth centres and publicly funded homebirth. In Australia, the choice to birth at home is often met with hostility from medical practitioners, while attracting disapproval from the majority of society. It is within this context that the women in this study have made their choice to birth outside the system. The research question for this study is: what motivates women to birth outside the system – that is, to have a homebirth with risk factors present, or a freebirth where the birth at home is intentionally unattended by health professionals.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Obstetrics;
Nursing
Classification
0380: Obstetrics
0569: Nursing
Identifier / keyword
(UMI)AAI10309903; Health and environmental sciences; Childbirth
Title
Birthing Outside the System: Wanting the best and safest. A grounded theory study about what motivates women to choose a high-risk homebirth or freebirth
Author
Jackson, Melanie Kathleen
Number of pages
362
Degree date
2014
School code
1936
Source
DAI-C 75/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781073947027
University/institution
University of Western Sydney (Australia)
University location
Australia
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Note
N.A.
Dissertation/thesis number
10309903
ProQuest document ID
1948832128
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/1948832128