Abstract/Details

CHILD MORTALITY IN NIGERIA: LEVELS AND SOCIOECONOMIC DIFFERENTIALS

SULAIMAN, ISMAILA LAWAL.  University of Pennsylvania. ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 1984. 8505135.

Abstract (summary)

The estimated cumulative probabilities of dying at ages 2, 3 and 5, for Southern Nigeria, are 135, 162 and 219 per 1000, respectively. The level of mortality under age 3 is about 4-6 percent higher in the Eastern that in the Western states, but above age 4 the estimates for the former are about 7-17 percent lower than those for the latter. It is estimated that the level of child mortality declined by about 0.97 years of life expectancy at birth per calendar year in the period 1964-66 - 1971-73.

Estimates of the effects of factors on child mortality using multivariate regression techniques developed by Trussell and Preston (1981) reveal: first, a one-year increase in mother's and father's education is associated with a child mortality reduction of about 6.5 percent and 5.1 percent, respectively. Second, ethnicity, religion and household composition have important influences on child mortality. Muslims, adherents of indigenous religions and Christians of African Protestant churches have higher levels of child mortality than Christians (Christians of mission churches). Third, mother's income is a significant determinant of child mortality with effects that are largely independent of factors controlled and greater than those of husband's income. A $100 increase in mother's and husband's income is associated with a child mortality reduction of 11 percent and 6 percent, respectively. Fourth, mother's employment in non-white collar occupations is associated with higher child mortality relative to being economically inactive; controlling for mother's income accentuates the mortality differential between the two groups of women.

Other findings are: first, couples with the least physical access to a health facility have higher levels of child mortality than those living in communities with a facility; furthermore, dispensaries have about the same effect on child mortality as hospitals. Second, the lower urban relative to rural child mortality is accounted for by the higher educational and income levels of urban residents. Third, a community water system and household toilet and running water make greater contribution to child survival in urban than rural areas. Fourth, both paternal and maternal grandfather's occupations have effects on child mortality, but their effects are mainly through the education parents received in their childhood. Finally, maternal premarital employment and place of birth and childhood residence are associated with significant child mortality differentials.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Demographics
Classification
0938: Demographics
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences
Title
CHILD MORTALITY IN NIGERIA: LEVELS AND SOCIOECONOMIC DIFFERENTIALS
Author
SULAIMAN, ISMAILA LAWAL
Number of pages
286
Degree date
1984
School code
0175
Source
DAI-A 46/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
University/institution
University of Pennsylvania
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
8505135
ProQuest document ID
303306552
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/303306552