Abstract/Details

A STUDY OF URBAN-RURAL FERTILITY DIFFERENTIALS IN THAILAND

THONGTHAI, VARACHAI.  University of Pennsylvania. ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 1986. 8614880.

Abstract (summary)

Urban-rural fertility differentials are usually observed during the fertility transition. Fertility is usually higher in rural areas than in urban areas. In Thailand, where more than 80 percent of the population lives in rural areas, the reduction in rural fertility is an essential element in reducing population growth rate, therefore, knowledge of factors underlying urban-rural fertility differentials is important.

To understand these differentials, this study employs contingency, multivariate, and intermediate variable analysis on data from 20 provinces under the Accelerated Family Planning and Health Program. Urban-rural differentials are observed in cumulative fertility but not in current fertility. The contingency analysis shows that differences in urban-rural and regional fertility are largely due to demand for children and to fertility regulation. Negative relationships are found between children ever born and education, and occupation, but the relationship between family income and children ever born is not established.

The multivariate analysis shows minimal differences in current fertility between urban and rural areas. Regional fertility differentials are still observed. Woman's education is found insignificant but female occupation is statistically significant. Husband's education, occupation and family income are statistically insignificant.

Using the intermediate variable analysis, contraceptive prevalence is an important factor in declining fertility but duration of breastfeeding acts as a counter force. Women with more education and higher occupational status are more likely to use contraceptives, and tend to shorten their duration of breastfeeding. Observed relationships are stronger in the urban areas. Overall, urban-rural fertility differentials are the result of interaction between contraception and breastfeeding. Although urban women breastfed shorter periods of time, which increases their fertility, their wider use of contraceptives results in lower fertility. Rural women breastfed longer but their fertility is higher due to less contraceptive prevalence. Nonetheless, increasing use of contraception in rural areas contributes to decline in rural fertility.

In sum, the small urban-rural fertility differentials are explained by Thai culture, which is receptive to contraceptive use; by the universal education; by widespread access to communication and transportation networks; and by exclusion of the capital/big cities in the analysis.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Demographics
Classification
0938: Demographics
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences
Title
A STUDY OF URBAN-RURAL FERTILITY DIFFERENTIALS IN THAILAND
Author
THONGTHAI, VARACHAI
Number of pages
168
Degree date
1986
School code
0175
Source
DAI-A 47/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
University/institution
University of Pennsylvania
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
8614880
ProQuest document ID
303509384
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/303509384