Abstract/Details

A qualitative/quantitative study of human bereavement responses to the death of an animal companion: Educational implications, resources, guidelines and strategies. (Volumes I-III)

McMahon, Sharon May (Girling).  Wayne State University. ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 1991. 9127246.

Abstract (summary)

A voluntary sample of 65 who experienced a pet death were recruited for this qualitative-quantitative study. After unexpected illness, death, lack of consent and selective participation, 35 (7 men, 28 women) adults remained as client-care recipient/pet owner informants. They completed a 300 item forced-choice questionnaire about health issues, pet death, beliefs, and bereavement, taped interview and gestalt drawing exercise.

Twenty-one veterinarians (D.V.M.'s) (17 male, 4 female) practising in the same Windsor-Essex County area volunteered to answer an open-ended 19 question survey and record an interview about issues associated with animal death.

From 162 selected animal-affiliated support, educational, counseling, publishing/media sources, 88 responses were received from letters inquiring about resources, activities, and interest in human responses to pet death.

The SAS package was used to computerize data analysis. Significant findings at $\pm$0.001, $\pm$0.01, $\pm$0.05 were made using "r", Spearman's rank correlation, and chi square for age, health, learning, lifestyle, attitudes, self-esteem, actions before, during, and after a pet's death.

Pet owners who stated that they resolved their grief could draw the mourned pet. Unresolved grievers could not.

Qualitative methodological and hermeneutic analysis of 30 audible tapes were used to uncover semantics, trends, patterns, themes, concepts and categories associated with grief, bereavement, health, lifestyle, beliefs often consistent with quantitative findings.

Similar processes applied to D.V.M.'s tapes, and surveys showed trends, patterns, and themes of personal and professional feelings, needs, thanatology base, beliefs, values, experiences, coping practices, client support, and ideas for public education about pet death, abuse, euthanasia, population control.

Grounded in the findings, the following end products were developed: age related pamphlets; a life-span "self-help" book; teaching videotape; print, media and T.V. resource list; curriculum guide; "at-risk" client assessment list, and protocols for volunteer preparation.

The evaluation of the end products remains to be done.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Curricula;
Teaching;
Academic guidance counseling;
Health education;
Psychotherapy
Classification
0727: Curricula
0727: Teaching
0519: Academic guidance counseling
0680: Health education
0622: Psychotherapy
Identifier / keyword
Education; Psychology
Title
A qualitative/quantitative study of human bereavement responses to the death of an animal companion: Educational implications, resources, guidelines and strategies. (Volumes I-III)
Author
McMahon, Sharon May (Girling)
Number of pages
1024
Degree date
1991
School code
0254
Source
DAI-A 52/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Linde, L. Vander; Makinson, D.
University/institution
Wayne State University
University location
United States -- Michigan
Degree
Ed.D.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9127246
ProQuest document ID
303961420
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/303961420