Abstract/Details

The presence and significance of Khepri in Egyptian religion and art

van Ryneveld, Maria Magdalena. 
 University of Pretoria (South Africa) ProQuest Dissertations Publishing,  1992. 0664942.

Abstract (summary)

The Egyptian god Khepri, represented as a scarab beetle, appeared in Egyptian religion from Pre-dynastic times, and in art from early dynastic times. He became very popular during the Middle Kingdom but was omitted under the Persian rule.

Because of the natural habits of the dung beetle he was seen as a self engendered god and associated with the sun, thus the sun-god Ra and recreation. He was included in the cosmogony of Heliopolis, which was later incorporated in that of Thebes. In religion he signified creation, protection and resurrection. Together with the wings of Horus he formed the emblem of Upper and Lower Egypt.

Khepri appeared in all art forms such as heart scarabs, mummy-coverings, coffins, jewelry, painting, relief and sculpture. His inclusion in art aimed to protect different aspects of the deceased for resurrection, i.e. to ensure new youth and life in the Netherworld.

Indexing (details)


Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts
Title
The presence and significance of Khepri in Egyptian religion and art
Author
van Ryneveld, Maria Magdalena
Number of pages
1
Degree date
1992
School code
6004
Source
MAI 31/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Rensburg, H. J. J. van; Millar, B. T.
University/institution
University of Pretoria (South Africa)
University location
South Africa
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
0664942
ProQuest document ID
304016142
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/304016142