Abstract/Details

The Naturalized Knowledge System: A methodology for community development

Leech, David J.   University of Ottawa (Canada) ProQuest Dissertations Publishing,  2000. MQ57128.

Abstract (summary)

The extensive experience of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Confederacy in adapting to their natural environment, and the distillation of this knowledge and the traditions of their peoples, offers us a comprehensive model for community development with the potential to overcome “crisis management” and begin planning for the future. Based on respect, equity, and empowerment, the Naturalized Knowledge System methodology enables us to evaluate, plan and promote community development at all levels—the individual, group, nation and confederacy. An adaptive tool, it learns from past mistakes and successes, integrating community development, cultural preservation, and environmental restoration into one process. The fundaments elements of the Naturalized Knowledge System methodology are developed in this paper, demonstrated in application to the community development of the Maleku First Nation of Costa Rica, and compared to other community development practices such as safety audits for women in urban environments, and creating place-based cultural representation in American cities. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Indexing (details)


Subject
Political science;
Social structure
Classification
0615: Political science
0700: Social structure
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences
Title
The Naturalized Knowledge System: A methodology for community development
Author
Leech, David J.
Number of pages
165
Degree date
2000
School code
0918
Source
MAI 39/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
978-0-612-57128-0
Advisor
Andrew, Caroline
University/institution
University of Ottawa (Canada)
University location
Canada -- Ontario, CA
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
MQ57128
ProQuest document ID
304667776
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/304667776/abstract