Abstract/Details

Effect of void damage and shear band development on the bendability of AA6111 automotive aluminum alloy sheet

Lievers, William Brent.  Carleton University (Canada). ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2001. MQ61019.

Abstract (summary)

Iron (Fe) has been shown to greatly influence the formability of aluminum alloys. Increased Fe results in a greater number of second-phase particles, which act as initiation sites for void damage. Four AA6111 Fe-variants have been studied, using a cantilever bend test apparatus, to determine the effect of void damage on bendability. To simulate the development of void damage and shear band localization, the kinematic hardening Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) equations have been reformulated for use in LS-DYNA, a commercial finite element method (FEM) code.

Bendability was found to be a function of reduced grain size and increased void damage, with increasing Fe content. Numerical predictions show that the greater curvature of the kinematic hardening yield surface allows shear bands to initiate more easily than under isotropic hardening conditions. Furthermore, the predictions were also found to be highly dependent upon the level of triaxial stress, the element size and aspect ratio, as well as the void nucleation parameters of the GTN equations.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Mechanical engineering;
Metallurgy
Classification
0548: Mechanical engineering
0794: Materials science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences
Title
Effect of void damage and shear band development on the bendability of AA6111 automotive aluminum alloy sheet
Author
Lievers, William Brent
Number of pages
220
Degree date
2001
School code
0040
Source
MAI 40/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
978-0-612-61019-4
Advisor
Pilkey, A. K.; Bell, R.
University/institution
Carleton University (Canada)
University location
Canada
Degree
M.Eng.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
MQ61019
ProQuest document ID
304687626
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/304687626