Abstract/Details

The changing nature of social relations: Young women's perceptions of their health and health-related practices in three coastal Newfoundland and Labrador communities

Martin, Debbie H.   Dalhousie University (Canada) ProQuest Dissertations Publishing,  2004. MQ94169.

Abstract (summary)

The following study explores young women's perceptions of how their social relationships influence their health and health-related practices. Data were collected in three small, coastal communities in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The study is set within a context of restructuring that has been on-going since the collapse of the fishery in 1992. One-on-one, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with eleven young women of Métis and non-Métis descent. The study is approached using a socio-ecosystem perspective, which recognizes the dynamic and reciprocal relationship that exists between the young women and the social, economic, political, industrial and natural environment. The findings reveal the central importance placed on key social relations for both emotional and physical health. However, the young women note that sometimes the strong, supportive relationships that are fostered in small, rural communities become difficult to maintain under the economic strain and uncertainty brought about by restructuring.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Public health;
Womens studies
Classification
0573: Public health
0453: Womens studies
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Social sciences
Title
The changing nature of social relations: Young women's perceptions of their health and health-related practices in three coastal Newfoundland and Labrador communities
Author
Martin, Debbie H.
Number of pages
96
Degree date
2004
School code
0328
Source
MAI 43/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
978-0-612-94169-4
Advisor
Jackson, Lois
University/institution
Dalhousie University (Canada)
University location
Canada -- Nova Scotia, CA
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
MQ94169
ProQuest document ID
305095666
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/305095666/abstract