Abstract/Details

A multi-faceted molecular approach to red wolf (Canis rufus) conservation and management

Adams, Jennifer R.   University of Idaho ProQuest Dissertations Publishing,  2006. 3250622.

Abstract (summary)

Recovery of the endangered red wolf (Canis rufus) depends upon the ability of the red wolf program to minimize hybridization with coyotes (Canis latrans). To accomplish this, the red wolf program needs to locate the presence of coyote and hybrid individuals across the 6000 km2 experimental population area. In addition, the red wolf program must understand red wolf space use to determine if coyotes will be excluded from breeding opportunities. Finally, in order to predict the impact of hybridization with coyotes on the red wolf population, the red wolf program needs to evaluate the effect of hybridization and introgression since reintroduction. To locate hybrid and coyote individuals in the red wolf experimental population area, eight microsatellite loci were optimized for use with fecal samples. A reference genotype data filtering approach is designed to ensure accurate fecal genotypes are produced (chapter 1). Fecal genotyping was combined with a genetic test of coyote ancestry and two spatially targeted sampling strategies to locate hybrid and coyote individuals across the experimental population area (chapter 2). Six hybrid and coyote individuals were identified in the fecal genotypes and five of these individuals were captured and removed from the population. Fecal locations were assessed as a method to delineate space use in red wolf packs by comparing them to radio-telemetry locations (chapter 3). Location data were compared using four different space use estimators, minimum convex polygon, bivariate normal and adaptive and fixed kernel. Results indicate fecal locations have great potential as an alternative approach to traditional location data in estimating red wolf space use. Finally, the effect of hybridization on the red wolf population since reintroduction was determined by reconstructing the wild red wolf pedigree (chapter 4). Genetic samples were obtained from 703 large canids from 1989 to 2006. Parentage assignments were made using eighteen-locus genotypes and the programs CERVUS 2.0 and Kinship 1.3.1. The first F1 hybridization event occurred in 1993 and is the only F1 event believed to have backcrossed to the red wolf population. Thus, the amount of coyote introgression into the red wolf population appears to be less than previously believed.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Ecology;
Zoology;
Forestry
Classification
0329: Ecology
0472: Zoology
0478: Forestry
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences; Canis rufus; Conservation; Red wolf
Title
A multi-faceted molecular approach to red wolf (Canis rufus) conservation and management
Author
Adams, Jennifer R.
Number of pages
164
Degree date
2006
School code
0089
Source
DAI-B 68/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
979-8-209-54889-8
Advisor
Waits, Lisette P.
University/institution
University of Idaho
University location
United States -- Idaho
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3250622
ProQuest document ID
305308641
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/305308641