Abstract/Details

Understanding the experience of adolescent motherhood, 1939–2001

Scaia, Margaret.  University of Calgary (Canada). ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2003. MQ87418.

Abstract (summary)

A feminist oral history approach was used in this study to understand how social and historical influences shape women's experiences of motherhood. Twelve women who had their first child between the years 1939 and 2001 were interviewed. The main research question was: ‘what was your experience of being a mother in your adolescent years?’ Analysis of transcript data reveals changing meanings over time. For older participants, early motherhood was described as ‘natural’: women expected to leave their parent's home, marry and bear children. Other options were either not considered, or did not exist for most women. Interviews with younger participants revealed that society today promotes independence in decision making for some behaviours, however the decision to mother for young unmarried women continues to be penalized. The birth control pill, legalization of abortion, reproductive rights, and demands for higher education are identified as significantly influencing different experiences of motherhood.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Families & family life;
Personal relationships;
Sociology
Classification
0628: Families & family life
0628: Personal relationships
0628: Sociology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences
Title
Understanding the experience of adolescent motherhood, 1939–2001
Author
Scaia, Margaret
Number of pages
137
Degree date
2003
School code
0026
Source
MAI 42/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
978-0-612-87418-3
Advisor
Ewashen, Carol
University/institution
University of Calgary (Canada)
University location
Canada
Degree
M.N.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
MQ87418
ProQuest document ID
305339893
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/305339893