Abstract/Details

Une approche théorique des conceptions du fédéralisme mises de l'avant par les revendications d'autonomie gouvernementale autochtones comme éléments de remise en question du fédéralisme canadien

Savard, Jean-Francois.   Carleton University (Canada) ProQuest Dissertations Publishing,  2006. NR16676.

Abstract (summary)

Aboriginal self-government and self-determination claims led Aboriginal theorists to put forward particular theoretical conceptions of federalism. This thesis seeks to determine whether the concept of federalism offers an analytical framework that allows a better understanding of the relationship between the Canadian state and Aboriginal people, and to assess in what ways conceptions of federalism, emerging from Aboriginal self-government and self-determination claims, question the practice of the Canadian federalism. To achieve these objectives, the analysis is based on a framework that conceives federalism according to two concepts: an inclusive one that relates to different federative forms, and one that distinguishes federalism and federation, federalism being a set of normative principles of a particular federal arrangement and federation being a set of institutional dimensions that characterize a federative form. The theoretical framework on which this thesis is based recognizes three approaches (European, American and Canadian) from which emerge different normative principles and institutional dimensions. The second chapter of this thesis distinguishes Aboriginal historical federal organizations from contemporary Aboriginal federalism by identifying their respective normative principles and institutional dimensions. The third chapter analyzes the approach of federalism that emerges from RCAP, including its respective normative principles and institutional dimensions. The fourth chapter puts these elements into perspective and demonstrates how the concept of federalism is useful to analyze the relationship between the Canadian state and Aboriginal people.

This thesis constitutes a theoretical contribution in understanding the impact of Aboriginal self-government within the Canadian federalism: a Canadian theoretical approach of federalism is identified; particular characteristics of different schools of thought of Aboriginal federalism are also identified; a systematic RCAP vision of federalism is recognized. Also, this thesis demonstrates that Aboriginal conceptions of federalism, emerging from self-government claims, question the practice of the Canadian federalism, and proves that there is an incompatibility between Aboriginal federal theories and the practice of Canadian federalism that makes the establishment of a genuine federal relationship between federal, provincial and Aboriginal governments particularly hard.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Political science;
Minority & ethnic groups;
Sociology;
Canadians;
Federalism;
Ethnic studies
Classification
0615: Political science
0631: Ethnic studies
0626: Sociology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Aboriginal; Federalism; Self-determination; Self-government
Title
Une approche théorique des conceptions du fédéralisme mises de l'avant par les revendications d'autonomie gouvernementale autochtones comme éléments de remise en question du fédéralisme canadien
Alternate title
A Theoretical Approach to the Conceptions of Federalism Put Forward by Indigenous Self-Government Claims as Elements of Questioning Canadian Federalism
Author
Savard, Jean-Francois
Number of pages
359
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0040
Source
DAI-A 67/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
978-0-494-16676-5
University/institution
Carleton University (Canada)
University location
Canada -- Ontario, CA
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertation or Thesis
Language
French
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
NR16676
ProQuest document ID
305353509
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
https://www.proquest.com/docview/305353509/abstract